Chickens Harvest Recipes

Egg Drop Soup from Your Garden and Coop

Written by Cricket

I’ve always loved the silky smooth quality of egg drop soup, and the fact that it has lots of egg protein. What I don’t like is that it is usually made with chicken broth, which means I don’t often order it. If I just can’t stand not having it, I will order it and ask if it’s vegetarian. Even when they say yes, I’m pretty sure it’s chicken broth. This brings me to one observation about restaurants, especially ethnic ones. If something doesn’t have a big slab of red meat in it, then it’s usually considered vegetarian, even if its made of meat broth, lard, or just doesn’t have easily discernable chunks of meat. Just a lifetime of experience under my belt on that one.

So just the other day I had a very strong craving for egg drop soup and decided to try making it using my homemade vegetable broth powder and eggs from my sweet chickens. What I came up with was DELISH! I will never order egg drop soup again.

Along with the veg powder, I also added a little nutritional yeast—that was a good call because it gave it that little bump of umami. It’s great without it, but if you have some give it a try.

If you are hungry and don’t have much time, this soup can be whipped up in less than 10 minutes from start to finish — just about the same time it takes to make a bowl of ramen on the stove.

Here is how to make Vegetarian Egg Drop Soup

First put about 2 cups of water in a pan (this is a hefty amount for one person) and add the vegetable powder. Set the burner to high.

While the water is heating up, break 2 eggs into a bowl and mix with a fork or spoon.

In a separate bowl, mix 2 heaping tablespoons of cornstarch or tapioca flour with about 1/4 cup of water. Add 1 heaping tablespoon of nutritional yeast, if using.

Once the water boils, add the cornstarch/tapioca mix and stir until thick. Turn off heat

Now it’s time to pour the egg into the soup and slowly stir. Remove from the heat and let it sit for a minute.

If you have green or i’itoi onions, just use your scissors to snip them in to little pieces over the pan.

That’s it. I like to add a little soy sauce and siracha to mine. It’s so good!

About the author

Cricket

Welcome to my blog! I’m Cricket (yes, my parents named me that!) and I’m a natural homesteader. Growing up in rural Idaho with a garden, a horse, and lots of canned food, I like to bring those sensibilities to my suburban home in Phoenix, Arizona. Add a little dose of cottage garden flavor and permaculture tendencies, and you’ll see why GardenVariety.Life is a reflection of everything I do.

I truly enjoy sharing the skills that promote a meaningful and practical connection to our gardens and environment. Because so many residents of the metro phoenix area are transplants, I find that the area’s unique desert climate is often misunderstood and underestimated in terms of what is possible. That’s where the fun begins. Arizona is a burgeoning permaculture haven with homesteading written all over it, and there is nothing I enjoy more than encouraging others to jump in and give it a try.

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